Crows Calling at Night

AH—WRITTEN WITH FEELING AND RESTRAINT. NOW, ARE THE TWO SEPARATED STANZAS TAKEN TOGETHER, OR AS TWO SEPARATE CHINESE LUDHI-?

September heart-to-hearts

Widow cries salty tears on her pillow
as rain falls in the ghost town.
She hears the cawing of the crows,
caw-caw, the reminder of his doom.
The lonely room echoes with melancholic sounds--
weeping, raining and crows calling at night.
Sorrowfully--she thinks of his handsome face
but neither sleep nor any respite comes.

The form loosely resembles Chinese LUSHI style:

  • eight lines long of couplets – The first couplet should set-up the poem; the middle two couplets develop the theme, the final couple is conclusion
  • each line must have the same number of words, either 5,6, or 7.
  • a mono-rhyme is on every even numbered line
  • Caesura (a pause) should separate clauses.

Posted over at dverse: poetics-china-kingdom-of-the-poem

Inspired by Crows Calling at Night by Li bai:

Yellow clouds beside the walls; crows roosting near. Flying back, they caw, caw; calling in the boughs. In the loom she weaves…

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About Jonathan Caswell

Mr. Caswell has been composing poetry at least since High School. He has been on WORD PRESS for ten years and contributes to two other blogs beside this one. This blog has a Christian emphasis but all bloggers are welcome. Mr. Caswell chooses to---with permission--re[post material of interest

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